Eruditorum Press

A workers state with executive dysfunction

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

10 Comments

  1. prandeamus
    October 31, 2013 @ 3:49 am

    I went to research Marston on Wikipedia, and found out that his occupations are listed as "Psychologist, Writer, Venusian". And why not?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Moulton_Marston unless it's been corrected by the time you read this…

    Reply

  2. Anton B
    October 31, 2013 @ 4:28 am

    Just read the preview pages on my Kindle. Marvelous stuff! You got me but I'm going to have to wait till after the season of expensive goodwill to actually buy a copy. Good luck with it and all your other projects Phil, I'm constantly amazed at where you find the time to maintain the quantity and quality of ypur writing.

    Reply

  3. Chris
    October 31, 2013 @ 5:55 am

    Not directly on topic, but Zazzle has 31% off today until 6pm Pacific. So for anyone who hasn't yet picked up a very wonderful Eruditorum volume 2 shirt or mug, today can be the day. Use code: HALLOWEENDAY

    http://www.zazzle.com/gifts?ch=eruditorumpress

    Reply

  4. jane
    October 31, 2013 @ 6:40 am

    It's a marvelous work, thorough and accessible and enlightening! I can't recommend it enough.

    Reply

  5. Eric Gimlin
    October 31, 2013 @ 8:20 am

    I enjoyed the book immensely; once I was able to figure out where it was hidden on Amazon yesterday. (Now, of course, you have the direct link up.)

    Will try and re-read it and get some more detailed thoughts and comments later. I will mention that I was pleased to see Christopher Priest (the comic writer, not the novelist) mentioned, but surprised that you didn't mention he was the go-to fill-in writer on WW for a while. Also, he's been dragged out of his comic book retirement:

    http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=48361

    Reply

  6. encyclops
    October 31, 2013 @ 10:32 am

    I'm very much looking forward to reading this. I'll most likely talk about it on encyclops.com when I'm done, but since (a) I have so many books in flight (including some of yours) that I don't know yet when I'll get a chance to read it, and (b) I like paying for work I want to support, no need to hook me up. 🙂 I've been a Wonder Woman fan since I was old enough to watch TV beyond Sesame Street, and have always had trouble coming to grips with her long history in comics.

    Reply

  7. timber-munki
    October 31, 2013 @ 10:40 am

    Will be purchasing, must admit that I'd no history with Wonder Woman (apart from watching the Lynda Carter show as a kid) untill the montoning/streamlining-for-multi-media-platforms that was the New 52 relaunch and currently it is the only DC book I'm still buying. The contrarian in me admires Azarello's willful ignoring of pretty much everything else that's happening in the DCU, as well as Chiang, Akin etc. art is just beautiful. Will be good to get some history on the character.

    The

    Reply

  8. gatchamandave
    December 5, 2013 @ 9:17 am

    Read it, loved it.

    Reply

  9. gatchamandave
    December 5, 2013 @ 9:42 am

    That was a bit of a test, actually. May I add a couple of comments ?

    My era of Wonder Woman is the Perez era. But from the start an aspect of that era troubled me, an aspect as aesthetically important as writer style or pencilled fashion, but one that rarely attracts attention -paper stock.

    At this time in its history DC uses four types of paper stock

    1 – standard. The usual newsstand standard comic book paper, high pulp content, poor colour grading, often so thin that pages bleed from front to back page, and at times damn near transparent

    2 – Quality. Used for higher end titles like New Teen Titans, The Outsiders and reprint series like The Saga of Ra's ally Ghul and Roots of the Swamp Thing. Heavy paper, good colour separation, no bleeding. Pricey. Sells for double the Mainstream standard issues.

    3 Prestige. Square bound graphic novels like The Dark Knight Returns and The Longview Hunters. Only for high concept projects, initially. Of course, eventually they use it for crap like Whom Gods Destroy ( Wonder Woman and Superman are married in an alternate world run by Nazis. Scripted by Chris Claremont. At his most verbose aka pompous )

    4 New Format. Now, this is midway between Quality and Mainstream and in the 90s becomes the standard format for DC comics ( eg Preacher ). Notably, this is the format that Vertigo titles like Swamp Thing and John Constantine are published in. Y'know, all those titles Karen Berger edits.

    Now, if you have George Perez art on your high concept mainstream identifiable characters – what format would you put it in ? Quality ? Maybe..but that's costly. Why not New Format ? Decent colours, defined art, no bleeding. They did, after all, put Roy and Dann Thomas's Young All Stars in that format and that's based on new spin offs of now defunct Golden Age heroes, and if that's not niche marketing, what is ?

    What you don't do is put it into the cheapest, nastiest, poorly printed paper you can.

    Unless you're DC – in which case, that's exactly what you do. Thus whilst Who Killed Mindy Meyer is a superb story, in its original format it's damn near unreadable.

    As for War of the Gods – obviously intended for Prestige Format, stuck out in , yup, standard mainstream that by 1991 is practically rotting in your hands. No one published in this format by then. ' cept for stoopid ol' DC when it comes to a project supposed to celebrate 50 years of one of its hottest properties.

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  10. Emi
    December 29, 2013 @ 11:05 pm

    Just at the second chapter. WW reader since childhood, avid book reader. The pompous style and the cliché it expose make me drop it. And i started again telling myself it was à bad attitude to buy something and let it aside. But i will finish it with à nasty taste that it will put false ideas about wW not even finished the second chapter and i read a paragraph which is totally false. It says that Etta candy isn't humiliated or look down upon. So what is it then when ww tell her on a train to her home that she should not eat so much and won't get à man cause man doesn't like women like that? And that her behaviour and weight are not patriotic? Lol sure thats helping her getting on a diet mister…as i see you saw il that way on the next paragraph page 18. Seriously.
    anyway reading that I'm afraid the rest is as controversed as this part to stay polite.
    I must say great marketing job i fall for it. Have à nice day I'm pleased to see people getting interested in her and sad they get wrong ideas after all…

    Reply

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