Eruditorum Press

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

6 Comments

  1. Daibhid C
    May 1, 2015 @ 12:49 pm

    It's amazing how many people I've heard of wrote for Knave. Neil Gaiman once explained on his blog (in the contect of Alan Moore, in fact) that his first sale was to a "respectable" magazine, which paid him £80 and never used it. His second was to a porn mag which paid him £200 and it appeared in the next issue. Who would you rather work for?

    I love how the illustration from "Sawdust Memories" blacks out Florence from Magic Roundabout's eyes, presumably so she can't be identified…

    The description of the cultural importance of football jumps between "English" and "British". But for cultural purposes, Scottish football is exactly the same, only different in almost all the details.

    Reply

  2. Daru
    May 4, 2015 @ 1:58 am

    I've never been a football fan, but as a Scottish kid I have glorious memories of my father helping me in the 70's, duck under wooden turnstiles to go and see (without paying) the Heart of Midlothian Football Club (or just Hearts) in Edinburgh. What grabbed me was the overall sensory experience of shouting & singing crowds, guys running on a pitch, chart music on the tannoys, meat pies and bovril at half time. I liked those things but didn't give two hoots about the game.

    Reply

  3. Daru
    May 4, 2015 @ 2:05 am

    "Originally played as a Shrovetide festivity in which neighboring towns and villages would attempt to drag an inflated pig’s bladder across the open space between the towns, with the objective being to get the ball into the neighboring town."

    In the Scottish Borders towns they have in many of them a summer community event called 'Common Ridings' (see: http://returntotheridings.co.uk/). They usually involve lots of horses and songs with the horses being ridden round the town boundaries as a kind of 'beating the bounds' – kind of funnily reminiscent of the Song of the Terraces.

    In the town of Jedburgh, not far from the border, they have a pretty wild form of early football game that still survives. The town sits on a high hill and as described above the game has little rules and is played between the 'Uppies' and the 'Downies' – those at the top and bottom of the town.

    Reply

  4. Daibhid C
    May 8, 2015 @ 12:46 am

    "The thing about football, the important thing about football, is that it's not just about football." –Unseen Academicals, Terry Pratchett

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  5. John Peacock
    May 10, 2015 @ 7:46 am

    I used to know someone who worked for a different top shelf magazine – I forget which once, Penthouse, I think. He said that in order to get proper advertisers, the magazine needed some kind of sensible content, but as it wasn't mission critical, what that content was was left up to the whim of the editor, which in this case favoured classic cars. So, on any given month, you could find, amongst the gynaecological pictorials, exhaustive and lovingly photographed essays on Bugattis, Aston Martins and so forth.

    The designer in question ended up in children's books, where I think he was a lot happier.

    Reply

  6. BerserkRL
    May 11, 2015 @ 11:55 pm

    Alan Moore's bear-in-the-air cartoon startles me, since I had a similar-looking (but more cyborgised — and of course less well-drawn) bear-in-the-air in a comic book I wrote in 1977.

    Reply

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