Eruditorum Press

We’re all for praxis, just not for going outside

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

6 Comments

  1. Jarl
    July 4, 2017 @ 3:12 pm

    Even robots appreciate the Sandifer approach.

    Speaking of the Sandifer approach, the Dark Knight Trilogy seems like an odd choice for a third part to this trilogy, most of all because it actually is a trilogy. Unless you’re, wisely, deciding to include the Prestige and Inception as entries in the trilogy, which they self-evidently are.

    That just leaves the question of what the fourth entry in your trilogy will be.

    Reply

    • Elizabeth Sandifer
      July 4, 2017 @ 5:04 pm

      Well, the reason this one is consistently inaccurately named is that there’s three of them, but they’re not actually linked or conceived of as a series. The Nolan films will probably be called An Accurately Named Trilogy.

      I can neither confirm nor deny plans for a part four.

      Reply

      • Sean Dillon
        July 6, 2017 @ 12:34 am

        Well, if you do it would be fitting to go with one on the Anthony Hopkins Lecter films, given that it’s probably going to be written after Proverbs of Hell 39/39.

        Reply

        • Sean Dillon
          July 6, 2017 @ 3:26 am

          An Inaccurately Ordered Trilogy!

          Reply

  2. CJM
    July 4, 2017 @ 9:28 pm

    I’m looking forward to this series. I think LOOPER does a classic example of narrative substitution. You think it’s a pulp gangster film, even though it’s a love story about selfish desire.

    Johnson’s got a really interesting view on love and passion, refusing to see this as always the net positive that it’s usually treated in Hollywood films, especially genre films. His two ‘noirs’ show how love can be corrupted into something driven by greed. It’s quite different when even the films of major directors (and ones who got their start in ways similar to Johnson) such as Paul Thomas Anderson and the Coen Brothers treat love as the redeeming trait of their characters, not the damning one.

    Reply

  3. Jesse
    July 5, 2017 @ 3:55 am

    (Time Bandits was not Gilliam’s debut.)

    Reply

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