Eruditorum Press

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

9 Comments

  1. Carey
    April 4, 2014 @ 4:20 am

    Another possible influence to the cadence and style of the narration to D.R. and Quinch is undoubtedly Malcolm McDowell's narration for Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange. This clip shows the sing son naifness which contrasts with the events that follow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=HtRGeyznv7k#t=30

    I'd also suggest Dennis Potter's Briimstone and Treacle, but am unsure of its influence in this regard as the sing song narration was more a feature in the original banned tv version, which Moore couldn't have seen at this point. The film, of course, would have a huge influence in Moore's writing in the next couple of years.

    Reply

  2. Jesse
    April 4, 2014 @ 4:58 am

    "Certainly some of the humor is in precisely how awful all of these things are to say and in the degree to which O.C. and Stiggs…"

    The degree to which they what? DON'T LEAVE US HANGING!

    Reply

  3. BerserkRL
    April 4, 2014 @ 6:18 am

    The missing text is hidden in an Easter Egg somewhere on the Internet. Good luck!

    Reply

  4. Alan
    April 4, 2014 @ 6:37 am

    So O.C. and Stiggs are basically the Ur-Beavis and Ur-Butthead. Interesting. As best I can recall, the "humor" of the magazine is watered down for the Altman film. I don't recall any obvious racism or homophobia that jumped out at me (certainly not in comparison to the rather vile examples described above). I suppose there was probably sexism, but the film was practically marketed as a teen sex comedy. Also, I'm almost positive that there was some tacked on explanation of why the two were completely justified (at least in their own minds) in their vendetta against Schwab. Something to do with Schwab having, through some act of greed, bringing about either the ruin or death of some friend of theirs. I dunno. Does anyone remember this incredibly bland film better than I do?

    Reply

  5. BerserkRL
    April 4, 2014 @ 6:53 am

    According to Wikipedia, "the original magazine characters were destructive, malevolent teenagers, whereas the main characters of the movie were not ."

    Reply

  6. Jesse
    April 4, 2014 @ 10:59 am

    The best redemptive reading for the movie is to view it as Altman trying to do to the '80s teen-comedy genre what he had earlier done to the war flick, the western, the film noir, etc.

    Reply

  7. Iain Coleman
    April 4, 2014 @ 4:10 pm

    Found it!

    "…have 15 million dollars in a Nigerian bank account which they need your help to transfer out of the country."

    Reply

  8. Alan
    April 5, 2014 @ 12:09 am

    I also seem to recall a lot of fourth-wall breaking which was mildly innovative at the time.

    Reply

  9. Daru
    February 17, 2015 @ 6:52 am

    Ah, I was a massive (and still am) fan of DR & Quinch when they came out, I read them over and over. Brilliant fun.

    Reply

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