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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

22 Comments

  1. Eric Gimlin
    October 10, 2013 @ 12:23 am

    Not that much to say, as we'll still in territory I'm not that familiar with. I do know we'll be coming back and back to DAREDEVILS, since that title has an insane amount of Alan Moore material beyond Captain Britain. I'm really looking forward to what you have to say about Night Raven; given that most people know it (if they know of it at all) as a precursor to V.

    Really not much to add, just wanted to remind you there are people reading and enjoying this. And I figured it deserved at least one semi on topic post before the Doctor Who discussion blows up later today. 🙂

    Reply

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  2. Anton B
    October 10, 2013 @ 1:34 am

    Still enjoying this immensely, another illuminating post. Never mind Watchmen, V etc. Promethea really is Moore's most personal and revealing work isn't it?

    Reply

  3. Nyq Only
    October 10, 2013 @ 8:56 am

    Again fascinating. Our tendency to categorize history (cultural or otherwise) into eras can make use forget tight connections between cultural movements. It is easy to think of Moore primarily in terms of 80's Britain but he brought with him the counterculture of the late 1960s.

    Reply

  4. Elizabeth Sandifer
    October 10, 2013 @ 8:58 am

    I think his outright most personal and revealing is The Birth Caul, but Promethea is right up there.

    Reply

  5. Elizabeth Sandifer
    October 10, 2013 @ 8:59 am

    I've not read the Night Raven short stories yet, but I am quite interested in what I'll have to say as well. 🙂

    Reply

  6. Eric Gimlin
    October 10, 2013 @ 9:29 am

    Let me know if you need any of them. I'm sure you have copies of all the Moore written ones, but I've got all but 2 of the text stories by other authors as well, including all the Jamie Delano stories.

    Reply

  7. Elizabeth Sandifer
    October 10, 2013 @ 9:34 am

    I've got a complete run of The Daredevils, though I'll need to hunt down some of the pre-text Night Raven appearances at some point. Still, I can probably manage that. 🙂

    Reply

  8. encyclops
    October 10, 2013 @ 11:00 am

    I feel as though I must just be missing it in the text, or ignorant of something obvious, but what's the source for Figure 102?

    Reply

  9. Elizabeth Sandifer
    October 10, 2013 @ 11:02 am

    It's the cover of Alan Moore's spoken word CD "Snakes and Ladders," which I talked about a bit on Eruditorum here: http://www.philipsandifer.com/2012/12/pop-between-realities-home-in-time-for_12.html

    Reply

  10. encyclops
    October 10, 2013 @ 11:23 am

    Ah, that's right, thanks!

    Reply

  11. Eric Gimlin
    October 10, 2013 @ 12:00 pm

    You probably can. If you can't I've got at least the first 14 (of 20) chapters from when they were reprinted in Captain Britain.

    I figured you had the Daredevils, and for that matter the Marvel Super-Heroes and the Mighty World of Marvels; and probably the Captain Britains. What I figured you might be missing were the Savage Actions and the Savage Sword of Conans. There's probably nothing relevant to the war in the Savage Action stories, honestly; but the SSoC's are by Jamie Delano and might have at least some bearing.

    Reply

  12. Theonlyspiral
    October 10, 2013 @ 4:14 pm

    Moore's work inspired my experimentations. Take that as you will.

    Reply

  13. Jesse
    October 10, 2013 @ 4:49 pm

    One thing that's fascinating about Crumb is that he's one of handful of artists whose work seems to represent the '60s counterculture—he's up there with Dylan, Hendrix, people like that—yet he basically had contempt for '60s counterculture. A hippie icon who hated hippies, even if he shared some of their taste in drugs and comics.

    Reply

  14. Jesse
    October 10, 2013 @ 4:52 pm

    By the way: Will you eventually be covering the Kool-Aid comic that Alan Moore did with Peter Bagge? One of my favorite entries in either man's C.V., though I wouldn't call it a "major work" in the usual sense of the phrase.

    Reply

  15. Anton B
    October 11, 2013 @ 12:19 am

    Oh yes The Birth Caul is amazing.

    Reply

  16. Kit
    October 12, 2013 @ 7:34 pm

    And it's by John Coulthart.

    BTW, where does Moore speak witheringly of recreational drug use?

    Reply

  17. Elizabeth Sandifer
    October 14, 2013 @ 10:52 am

    Sorry to have been slow answering this – I got it from a 2009 interview in Mustard Magazine, which I have in the University of Mississippi Press Alan Moore: Conversations volume. The relevant quotes are "I don't take anything purely for entertainment's sake, which I think is perhaps my saving grace. We are certainly not the first culture to have drugs, but we may well be one of the first to have a drug problem. I think there is a place for drugs in society, but it's a shamanic space that we don't really have anymore." And, subsequently, "In our current society, the only context we have to take drugs is in a leisure context, which a lot of time is disastrous."

    Reply

  18. Daru
    February 15, 2015 @ 9:53 am

    Having not been able to read when it was first posted, I have to say I am loving this Phil as you go over some work I am very familiar with and explore areas I have never been before. Great, inspiring stuff and learning much.

    Reply

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