Eruditorum Press

This machine mildly irritates fascists

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L.I. Underhill is a media critic and historian specializing in pop culture, with a focus on science fiction (especially Star Trek) and video games. Their projects include a critical history of Star Trek told through the narrative of a war in time, a “heretical” history of The Legend of Zelda series and a literary postmodern reading of Jim Davis' Garfield.

2 Comments

  1. Ross
    September 4, 2015 @ 9:38 am

    Plato's theory that humans and human longing were created when a singular flawless being was split into man and woman at some point in prehistory (and his belief the metaphor need not be gendered to be effective)

    Except that (Puts on "I attended the 1997 Loyola College Colloquium on Plato's Symposium" hat) it's not Plato's theory. It's Aristophanes. And it's the comic relief. (The punch line of the whole segment is Aristophanes declaring that gay men are superior since in their prefallen state, they were 100% male rather than hermaphrodites. Also, fun fact, one of only two direct references to lesbians in greek literature of the period)

    the deaths of Terry's former shipmates were incredibly meaningful, despite what Terry might now think. Because, as she tells her “They made you sick of death. So sick of it, in fact, you couldn't countenance any more of it.”

    I dunno. I find something kind of ooky about ideas like "Your death served the higher purpose of being an object lesson to someone else."

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  2. Daru
    September 7, 2015 @ 9:23 pm

    The ending of this tale sounds quite beautiful and as with you. I am glad that this experience is Laren's as she is in my mind very deserving, having been pretty poorly served by the show.

    Reply

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