Eruditorum Press

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

8 Comments

  1. Anton B
    February 11, 2014 @ 9:34 am

    You forgot 'where do you get your ideas from?'

    Reply

  2. Josiah Rowe
    February 11, 2014 @ 10:15 am

    Here's one I don't recall having been discussed here (and if it has, please feel free to ignore and/or point me towards the previous discussion): do you believe in the Omnirumour, in any form? Do you think that there are more officially missing episodes of Doctor Who in the vaults of TIEA, or anywhere else? And what does the undying nature of the Omnirumour say about Doctor Who fandom?

    Reply

  3. Eric Rosenfield
    February 11, 2014 @ 11:22 am

    Will you do Night of the Doctor for the book release of the Wilderness Years?

    Reply

  4. Dan
    February 11, 2014 @ 3:13 pm

    In the Woody Allen case it's quite simple: either Woody or Mia are lying. Whichever of them is lying is truly beyond the moral pale, if in different ways and degrees. . Dylan Farrow can be telling the truth as far as she sees it in either case. Saying "I believe the victim" appears to give the impression that we know whether Allen is guilty or not. (Have you read Allen's op-ed piece in the NYT? I know nothing and have researched nothing beyond the open letter and the op-ed piece, and wish I knew the truth of the matter.)

    And the amount of people on Twitter saying "if you say 'innocent until proven guilty' you are a bad person and I'm blocking you" and words to that effect is surprising. Sure they're not bound by the legal process in the "innocent until proven guilty" sense (only in a libel law sense), and they're coming from the point that powerless abuse victims have long been ignored or not taken seriously , but, from those two things I have read, and certainly without calling DF a liar, WA hasn't remotely been proven guilty.

    Reply

  5. Spacewarp
    February 11, 2014 @ 10:01 pm

    I'd guess next time you're in the UK you'll be looking up the Earls Court Police Box. Well if you've got time you could also go here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxtiv7T5gXM

    (That's me filming and talking by the way)

    Reply

  6. Spacewarp
    February 11, 2014 @ 10:39 pm

    The recent verdicts for Michael La Vell and William Roache spring to mind, and I am watching the cases of Dave Lee Travis and Rolf Harris very closely. The ghost of Jimmy Savile has a lot to answer for.

    Reply

  7. David Ainsworth
    February 12, 2014 @ 5:03 am

    Babylon 5 is a really strange example, given that fan input had no real effect on the show and that Warner Brother have made lots of money selling DVDs. Why not Sliders, or Firefly/Serenity, or even Doctor Who in the 90's? And if you're looking at today, compare The Big Bang Theory to, say, Community to see how much influence geeks have on pop culture.

    Reply

  8. Froborr
    February 12, 2014 @ 5:28 am

    I think the point is that Babylon 5 was made for and actively courted a geek audience. It remains a pure cult work, with a small but dedicated audience; reasonably profitable, but not particularly influential. (Indeed, the genre of which it was part is basically dead.)

    Contrast something like Buffy, which had (and has) a sizeable geek following but did not actively court that audience and was not made for them. (Indeed, geeks are pretty consistently depicted extremely negatively in the show, most obviously with the Trio, but note also that most of Willow's character development consists of maturing away from initial geekiness.) Buffy was not only commercial successful, but also extremely influential, including serving as the template for the Davies era.

    Reply

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