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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

10 Comments

  1. mx_mond
    September 19, 2017 @ 9:26 am

    “The most likely reading is that he respects beasts of burden for their acceptance of subservience, finding a spiritual power in the fact that they do not think themselves more than they are”.

    I have thought for some time that the “rudeness” that Hannibal punishes with killing is lack of class: his victims usually seem to be rather well-off, but their (perceived by Hannibal) lack of manners betrays them as phoneys, whereas Hannibal is “authentic” upper class. Viewed through that lens, he is a personification of class system and rigid divisions, where people know their place.

    “Hannibal’s line about doing bad things to bad people, meanwhile, is a restatement of an earlier exchange with Margot, drawing links between her and Will well in advance of their actual intersection”.

    It’s been a long time since I watched Hannibal, so I forgot a lot of things. One of them is the fact that the show is aware of the distinction between Hannibal’s urges and Will’s. In season 3, it seemed to me as if the show was going for a straightforward case of “Hannibal and Will are the same!”, where for me that blatantly wasn’t the case. I’m very happy that the show realised that.

    Reply

    • Jack Graham
      September 19, 2017 @ 11:21 am

      Hannibal has the aristocrat’s peculiar feeling of kinship with the proletariat. Both classes are, or have been, victims of the bourgeoisie.

      Reply

    • Przemek
      September 20, 2017 @ 11:30 am

      “Viewed through that lens, [Hannibal] is a personification of class system and rigid divisions, where people know their place.”

      Interesting. What do we make, then, of his passion for fostering budding killers? Can they be read as the aspiring upper middle class individuals who may get accepted by the aristocracy if they prove to have the necessary manners and aesthetic taste? Or are they merely his lower class playthings, his pet projects to be discarded when they stop being fun? (Professor Higgins and Eliza from Shaw’s “Pygmalion” come to mind). Or they could his cabinet of curiosities, a proper (if a little eccentric) hobby for a gentleman from a bygone age.

      I’m also curious what would middle-class Hannibal be like (and whether such a character is even possible). As for the lower class, the answer seems obvious: Jack the Ripper.

      Reply

      • Kaan Vural
        September 21, 2017 @ 6:31 pm

        “Interesting. What do we make, then, of his passion for fostering budding killers? Can they be read as the aspiring upper middle class individuals who may get accepted by the aristocracy if they prove to have the necessary manners and aesthetic taste?”

        I was put in mind of aristocratic patronage of artistic and scientific pursuits. The Medici provided Da Vinci with the funds to explore his interests; Lecter provides motivation and clarity of purpose.

        Reply

        • Przemek
          September 22, 2017 @ 11:55 am

          Ooh, a very good reading.

          Reply

      • mx_mond
        September 22, 2017 @ 10:29 am

        “I’m also curious what would middle-class Hannibal be like”

        Self-reliance strikes me as a distinctly middle-class virtue, so a middle-class Hannibal would probably target those who do not possess it: all the “moochers”, all those who ask him for help.

        Reply

        • Przemek
          September 22, 2017 @ 11:54 am

          Good point. I imagine he would also be a self-made man, disgusted by those who seem lost and need guidance. He would probably still foster killers in whatever line of work he chose (a police officer, maybe?), but he would set them up to fail and be caught as a punishment for their weakness.

          He could also target upper class people who he considers unworthy of their social status – I think he would consider them “rude”.

          Reply

  2. Jack Graham
    September 19, 2017 @ 11:31 am

    I can’t say I’d noticed whether Thomas Harris is especially given to hendiadys, but there is something Harrisian about the particular hendiadys in question. It is prosaic in a weaponised way, and the second word complicates the first without also undermining it.

    Parenthetically, it also occurs to me that Margot is very much in Hamlet’s situation here. To kill a usurping substitute father figure steeped in incest or not to kill a usurping substitute father figure steeped in incest .. with the temptation to act coming from a possibly infernal source. Hendiadys is rampant throughout ‘Hamlet’.

    Reply

  3. Sean Dillon
    September 19, 2017 @ 3:58 pm

    Those interested in this aesthetic of sex should also check out Sense8 and the pornographic work of Four Chambers.

    Specifically, Sacred Geometry and The Function of The Flesh.

    Reply

  4. Joseph
    September 23, 2017 @ 9:50 am

    A pretty trivial comment, but still perhaps worth noting that the bird “hatching” from Sarah is… a starling. The starlings in the Hague love pecking about under the butcher’s tables Haagse Markt, as it happens, so you will often see them fluffing and shaking to clear blood from them.

    Reply

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