Eruditorum Press

Temporarily embarrassed proletarians

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Elizabeth Sandifer

Elizabeth Sandifer created Eruditorum Press. She’s not really sure why she did that, and she apologizes for the inconvenience. She currently writes Last War in Albion, a history of the magical war between Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. She used to write TARDIS Eruditorum, a history of Britain told through the lens of a ropey sci-fi series. She also wrote Neoreaction a Basilisk, writes comics these days, and has ADHD so will probably just randomly write some other shit sooner or later.Support Elizabeth on Patreon.

4 Comments

  1. Sean Dillon
    February 20, 2018 @ 6:35 pm

    [Looks up Object 47 of Milton a Poem]

    OH MY GOD! That’s… that’s… yeah.

    Reply

  2. Doctor Memory
    February 20, 2018 @ 11:34 pm

    Aside from the eponymous beast, there is no particular reason why we should have a random insert of the sea here.

    The fact that it looks suspiciously like a sonogram of a uterus may be relevant?

    Reply

  3. mx_mond
    February 21, 2018 @ 9:54 am

    “There is a dash of incel to Dolarhyde, although this is firmly segregated from his motivation for murder. Nevertheless, his clear sense of himself as someone it is “bizarre” to imagine touching “a living woman” positions him clearly adjacent to a certain and timely vision of toxic masculinity”.

    I commented under the previous post on the blurring lines between sexual desire and desire for transformation. Dollarhyde’s contact with Reba showed him a new way of being. The part of him that observed his conversation with Lecter in the last episode, the human part, is now strenghtened. No wonder he feels his duality with the Dragon more acutely, even hearing his voice. I feel like this might be the first time (or at least the first in some time) where the Dragon’s thoughts are distinctly not his own.

    “a deeply unexpected parallelism”

    In this particular context, yes, although not necessarily when we take into account that there are much deeper parallels as well. Both Will and Dollarhyde struggle with a demonic voice that offers them the possibility of (tr)a(n)scending to another state of being. For both this is a masculine voice and there are a lot of homoerotic undertones. Both have a woman figure in their lives that offers a different, more human, more down-to-earth existence. Both are doomed.

    “A sadly tragic case of crossed purposes, as Dolarhyde asks a gross and ableist question about the fundamental monstrosity of his own soul. Which is actually an even crueler sort of ablism, moving from “presumptuous and invasive questions” to “treating disability as equivalent to moral damnation due to possession by a demonic serial killer.””

    Old habits are hard to shake, and even though Reba shows him other ways of being, Dollarhyde tretas even her as a shard of mirror in which to regard himself. I wonder if it’s the Dragon in him or if he’s just an asshole. If it’s the latter, maybe he dooms himself to becoming the Dragon in the end.

    “Hannibal’s comment about faces in the crowd being worse than the crazy sons of bitches immediately before admitting that he flat-out told Dolarhyde to murder Will’s family is amusing in its complete disinterest in even pretending to actually be any sort of justification, as opposed to bullshit philosophical posturing for its own sake”.

    It also fits interestingly with last episode’s discussions of cruelty requiring empathy. The banal evil which lacks empathy is here posited as worse than the highly refined variety of Hannibal.

    Reply

  4. Przemek
    February 21, 2018 @ 11:43 am

    “There is a dash of incel to Dolarhyde, although this is firmly segregated from his motivation for murder. Nevertheless, his clear sense of himself as someone it is “bizarre” to imagine touching “a living woman” positions him clearly adjacent to a certain and timely vision of toxic masculinity.”

    Ooh, very interesting. And of course this feeling of sexual inadequacy pushes him towards the fantasy of being both alienated from his own body and transformed into a sexually dominating monster.

    This idea of negative transformation, of the process of becoming more monstrous subjectively experienced as personal growth is what fascinates and scares me the most about this show. And about the real world, too.

    “HANNIBAL: Social media, I imagine. Can’t be too careful with privacy settings.”

    Now I’m imagining Hannibal posting his cannibalistic confessions on Facebook with the “Only Me” privacy setting. And then the one time he makes a mistake is the moment Miriam Lass almost catches him.

    “WILL GRAHAM: I had a random encounter.”

    The moment Will realizes he’s in a D&D campaign with Hannibal as the DM and suddenly everything makes so much sense.

    Reply

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