Eruditorum Press

The struggle in terms of the strange

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L.I. Underhill is a media critic and historian specializing in pop culture, with a focus on science fiction (especially Star Trek) and video games. Their projects include a critical history of Star Trek told through the narrative of a war in time, a “heretical” history of The Legend of Zelda series and a literary postmodern reading of Jim Davis' Garfield.

1 Comment

  1. K. Jones
    April 24, 2015 @ 1:59 pm

    That's a fair reading. This is a strong Frakes outing. The bummer there is that I think this and Best of Both Worlds II are like the only major Frakes spotlights of the season. (Though he's at least featured pretty well in Night Terrors and somewhat ironically in The Host.)

    It's kind of a casualty of the fact that Riker, being a friendly soul and something of the glue holding the crew together, who can thus play well in everybody else's spotlight stories, kind of gets underutilized because of it.

    Anyway, Future Imperfect is fun albeit low-stakes. Since it's a serialized show before anyone ever thought of doing a real time-jump, the stakes are relatively low, but it's neat then that we switch into figuring how Riker will solve the mystery and wake up out of what's essentially a few dream-puzzles. And he's even a pretty good choice for a character to afflict with this kind of conundrum – because while he's got adequate amounts of Enterprise curiosity and Starfleet know-how, his insight is the name of the game (and once again Riker kind of proves ironically to be as insightful as Counselor Troi.)

    So it's an appropriate episode with enough interest and fun to be eminently watchable. This season has been alternating 2-to-1 good to bad ratios so far and we've got a bit to go before we start getting good runs.

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